Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2018, Page: 112-117
Optimal Cropping Sequence in Pluriactive Non-specialised Vegetable Farms in the Northwest Region of Cameroon
Godlove Shu, Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness, Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon; Centre for Independent Development Research, Buea, Cameroon
Jules René Minkoua Nzie, Department of Economics, Faculty of Social and Management Science, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon
Ernest L. Molua, Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness, Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon; Centre for Independent Development Research, Buea, Cameroon
Received: May 26, 2018;       Accepted: Oct. 4, 2018;       Published: Oct. 29, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijae.20180305.13      View  297      Downloads  18
Abstract
Cameroon champions the vegetable subsector in the Central African sub region both in output levels, export quantities and foreign exchange earnings. The country exports, formally and informally, fresh vegetables to neighboring countries like Nigeria, Central African Republic, Gabon and Equatorial Guinea. Besides ensuring food self-sufficiency, the primary intention of these pluriactive non-specialized vegetable farmers who also cultivate staple energy food crops as complementary and supplementary enterprises is to maximize farm profits subject to the numerous constraints. These constraints are further compounded by an acute incidence of climate variability, seasonal price fluctuations and poor farm planning. This study sought to find out an annual cropping pattern or sequence that maximizes annual returns and enhances the optimal allocation and utilization of farm resources. The study adopted the stratified random sampling technique to interview 120 vegetable farmers in the Northwest Region of Cameroon, from which pluriactive non-specialized were identified. This data was subjected to inferential statistical and dynamic programming analytical techniques. Theresults identified sixteen species of vegetable crops cultivated alongside energy food crops in the study area. The study further identified three cropping seasons in a year (March-June, July-October, and November-February) and suggested the prioritization of the tuber vegetable during the first cropping season, the leafy vegetables during the second cropping season and the fruit vegetables during the third cropping season. This optimal cropping pastern is highly responsive to climate weather risks and market shocks thus presenting potentials of yielding higher profits of up to 5 256 614.8 FCFA ((US$ 8761.0) per annum from pluriactive vegetable farming.
Keywords
Vegetable Gardens, Farm Planning, Dynamic Programming, Climate Variability, Cameroon
To cite this article
Godlove Shu, Jules René Minkoua Nzie, Ernest L. Molua, Optimal Cropping Sequence in Pluriactive Non-specialised Vegetable Farms in the Northwest Region of Cameroon, International Journal of Agricultural Economics. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2018, pp. 112-117. doi: 10.11648/j.ijae.20180305.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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