Volume 3, Issue 3, May 2018, Page: 53-64
Quantitative Assessment of Yam Based Farmers’ Perception on Climate Change in Edo State, Nigeria
Jerumeh Elijah Gift, Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Okoruwa Victor Olusegun, Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Sowunmi Fatai Abiola, Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Idiaye Chuks Onyeka, Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Received: Mar. 7, 2018;       Accepted: Mar. 26, 2018;       Published: Jun. 25, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijae.20180303.13      View  632      Downloads  61
Abstract
Using data collected from 250 yam based farming households in the Edo state, Nigeria, the study demonstrated the quantitative assessment of yam based farmers’ perception on climate change. Farmers' perceptions on three important climatic variables in agricultural production (temperature, rainfall and wind intensity) were quantified using a quasi-arbitrary ordinal weighting system. The results revealed first demand indices for temperature, rainfall and wind intensity as 0.87, 0.38 and 0.84 respectively while the first supply indices for temperature, rainfall and wind intensity were 0.27, 0.22 and 0.14 respectively. The study indicated significant increase and decrease in temperature and rainfall respectively. The study also affirmed that climate change contributed significantly to reduction in yam production in the study area. The study recommends the need for programmes geared towards providing farmers with effective adaptation strategies which would help provide a buffer against adverse climatic conditions.
Keywords
Perception, Climate Change, Quasi-arbitrary Ordinal Weighting System, Demand and Supply Indices
To cite this article
Jerumeh Elijah Gift, Okoruwa Victor Olusegun, Sowunmi Fatai Abiola, Idiaye Chuks Onyeka, Quantitative Assessment of Yam Based Farmers’ Perception on Climate Change in Edo State, Nigeria, International Journal of Agricultural Economics. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2018, pp. 53-64. doi: 10.11648/j.ijae.20180303.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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